‘Dodgy’ greenhouse gas data threatens Paris accord

‘Dodgy’ greenhouse gas data threatens Paris accord

SOURCE: BBC DATE: Aug 8, 2017 SNIP: Potent, climate-warming gases are being emitted into the atmosphere but are not being recorded in official inventories, a BBC investigation has found. Air monitors in Switzerland have detected large quantities of one gas coming from a location in Italy. However, the Italian submission to the UN records just a tiny amount of the substance being emitted. Levels of some emissions from India and China are so uncertain that experts say their records are plus or minus 100%. Prof Glen Peters, from the Centre for International Climate Research, in Oslo, said: “The core part of Paris [is] the global stock-takes which are going to happen every five years, and after the stock-takes countries are meant to raise their ambition, but if you can’t track progress sufficiently, which is the whole point of these stock-takes, you basically can’t do anything. “So, without good data as a basis, Paris essentially collapses. It just becomes a talkfest without much...
Carbon in Atmosphere Is Rising, Even as Emissions Stabilize

Carbon in Atmosphere Is Rising, Even as Emissions Stabilize

SOURCE: New York Times DATE: June 26, 2017 SNIP: The excess carbon dioxide scorching the planet rose at the highest rate on record in 2015 and 2016. A slightly slower but still unusual rate of increase has continued into 2017. Scientists are concerned about the cause of the rapid rises because, in one of the most hopeful signs since the global climate crisis became widely understood in the 1980s, the amount of carbon dioxide that people are pumping into the air seems to have stabilized in recent years, at least judging from the data that countries compile on their own emissions. That raises a conundrum: If the amount of the gas that people are putting out has stopped rising, how can the amount that stays in the air be going up faster than ever? Does it mean the natural sponges that have been absorbing carbon dioxide are now...
Atmospheric CO2 levels accelerate upwards, smashing records

Atmospheric CO2 levels accelerate upwards, smashing records

SOURCE: National Observer DATE: April 10, 2017 SNIP: The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere continues to accelerate upwards despite global efforts. The last two years had “unprecedented” increases. Canadian CO2 extraction is playing an oversized role. The primary driver of global warming, disruptive climate changes and ocean acidification is the ever-increasing amount of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. Despite decades of global efforts towards climate policies, clean energy and efficiency, CO2 levels continue to rise and are actually accelerating upwards. For those of us hoping for signs of climate progress, this most critical and basic climate data is bitter news indeed. It shows humanity racing ever more rapidly into a full-blown crisis for both our climate and our oceans. Read the rest of this excellent post...
Carbon Footprint of Canada’s Oil Sands Is Larger Than Thought

Carbon Footprint of Canada’s Oil Sands Is Larger Than Thought

SOURCE: Inside Climate News DATE: April 4, 2017 SNIP: The Donald Trump administration approved the Keystone XL pipeline knowing the tar sands crude oil it would deliver from Canada is even more polluting than the Obama administration thought when it turned the project down in 2015. Recent government studies of a different tar sands pipeline found that the project’s greenhouse gas emissions “may be five to 20 percent higher than previously indicated,” the State Department noted on March 23 in its decision approving the Keystone XL...
Forest fragmentation may be releasing much more carbon than we think

Forest fragmentation may be releasing much more carbon than we think

SOURCE: Mongabay DATE: March 31, 2017 SNIP: The earth’s forests have been broken into around 50 million fragments, the edges of which add up to a length that would make it a third of the way to the sun and which increase annual tropical deforestation carbon emissions by 31 percent. This, according to a new study published recently in Nature Communications that reveals forest fragmentation may be much more destructive than previously thought. … Current estimates peg the volume of carbon emissions from the clearing of tropical forests at around 1,100 million metric tons annually. Using field data and computer modeling, the team calculated 340 million more metric tons of carbon may be released globally due to forest edge effects. In other words, the study finds forest fragmentation may be contributing 31 percent more carbon to the atmosphere than previous estimates are accounting...