Study discovers why global warming will accelerate CO2 rise

Study discovers why global warming will accelerate CO2 rise

SOURCE: University of Reading DATE: November 28, 2017 SNIP: Global warming is likely to speed up as the Earth becomes increasingly more sensitive to atmospheric CO₂ concentrations, scientists from the University of Reading have warned. In a new study, published this week in the prestigious journal PNAS, the scientists explain that the influence of increasing levels of atmospheric CO2 on global warming will become more severe over time because the patterns of warming of the Earth’s surface will lead to reduced cloud cover in some sensitive regions and less heat being able to escape into space. The findings are supported by observations, suggesting that forecasts made by climate models evaluated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are...
Every Other Summer Will Shatter Heat Records Within a Decade

Every Other Summer Will Shatter Heat Records Within a Decade

SOURCE: Motherboard and Earth’s Future Open Access Journal DATE: November 1, 2017 SNIP: Think of the stickiest, record-hot summer you’ve ever experienced, whether you’re 30 or 60 years old. In 10 years or less, that miserable summer will happen every second year across most of the US and Canada, the Mediterranean, and much of Asia. By the 2030s, every second summer over almost all of the entire Northern hemisphere will be hotter than any record-setting hot summer of the past 40 years, the study found. By 2050, virtually every summer will be hotter than anything we’ve experienced to date. Record hot summers are now 70 times more likely than they were in the past 40 years over the entire Northern hemisphere, the peer-reviewed study...
Swarms of Monarch Butterflies Stuck Up North

Swarms of Monarch Butterflies Stuck Up North

SOURCE: Yale Environment 360 DATE: October 27, 2017 SNIP: Tens of thousands of monarch butterflies that should be in Texas by now, en route to their wintering grounds in Mexico, are still in the northern U.S. and Canada, their migrations delayed due to above-average temperatures and strong winds this fall. The large number of stragglers is “definitely new territory for us,” University of Kansas biologist Chip Taylor, director of Monarch Watch, told the AP. After weeks of warmer-than-usual weather, temperatures from the Great Lakes to New England are beginning to fall. Monarchs’ muscles stop functioning correctly when temperatures are in the 50s, so scientists warn that unless the butterflies start their 3,000-mile journey south soon, many of them may end up stuck up north and die. Even if they do leave now, many of the plants they eat along the way will be gone by the time they reach them, making starvation a real threat, biologists said. Monarch populations have been in decline for years, plummeting from 1 billion to 33 million in just two...
Warm winters, scorching summers: New maps project impact of climate change

Warm winters, scorching summers: New maps project impact of climate change

SOURCE: National Post DATE: October 26, 2017 SNIP: Is this the end of the Great Canadian winter? A new report says that even if greenhouse gas emissions are reduced, all of Canada is projected to get warmer by the end of the century, while the number of 30 C plus days per year are predicted to “explode” under the current global warming trajectory. Overall, the globe is projected to warm by two to three degrees Celsius by 2051 to 2080, compared to 12 degrees or more for some places in the Canadian High Arctic, assuming the high-carbon future we’re trending towards, Smith said in an email. Toronto’s summers are projected to warm by four degrees Celsius by 2051 to 2080 in a high-carbon scenario; in comparison, its winters are projected to warm five degrees Celsius. Churchill summers will warm by 3.5 degrees Celsius; its winters by nine...
Hurricane Irma, global warming and the bomb: comparing energy giants

Hurricane Irma, global warming and the bomb: comparing energy giants

SOURCE: National Observer DATE: October 11, 2017 SNIP: [H]ow does the ferocious energy of Hurricane Irma measure up to the energy that global warming is adding to our climate? Global warming is pumping energy into our climate at the rate of: * 4 atomic bombs a second * 36 Hurricane Irmas​ blasting non-stop * 13 times all global energy use However you slice it, it’s a crazy-huge amount of...