French nuclear production reduced by 3.1 GW due to heatwave

French nuclear production reduced by 3.1 GW due to heatwave

SOURCE: Reuters DATE: August 3, 2018 SNIP: The heatwave across France has forced French utility EDF to reduce or cut nuclear electricity generation at four reactors, power grid operator RTE said on Friday. EDF, which operates the 58 nuclear reactors that cover around 75 percent of France’s electricity needs, extended outages at the 900 megawatt (MW) Bugey 2 and St. Alban 1 nuclear reactors until Aug. 11. Production was reduced by 665 MW at the 900 MW Bugey 3, and by 300 MW at its 900 MW Fessenheim 2 reactor. EDF said on Wednesday said that forecasts of high temperatures in the Rhone River could lead to the shutdown from Aug. 3 of four nuclear reactors which depend on its waters for cooling: Bugey 2 and 3, St Alban 1 and 2. The utility discharges water it uses as coolant for the reactors into surrounding rivers and canals. The quantity and temperature of the water it discharges is regulated by law to protect plant and animal life, forcing EDF to cut output during prolonged hot weather when river temperatures rise. On Friday, water temperature rose to over 26 degrees Celsius (78.8°F) upstream the Rhine River where Fessenheim is located. On the Rhone, the water temperature was also at 26 degrees, according to Thomson Reuters...
Heat waves can be deadly for workers and will drain the US economy

Heat waves can be deadly for workers and will drain the US economy

SOURCE: Vox DATE: July 27, 2018 SNIP: As temperatures surge around the world, many cities and countries are breaking heat records. Massive wildfires have ignited in Europe and the United States amid the scorching weather, destroying thousands of acres of wilderness. Hundreds have died this year between the heat and fires. But the recent hot weather is dangerous in more subtle ways, and is an ominous signal of what increasing average temperatures and climate change portend for some of the most vulnerable who must endure the heat to earn a living. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 15 million people in the United States have jobs that require them to be outdoors at some point, and rising temperatures are already proving dangerous for them. In Georgia, Miguel Angel Guzman Chavez, a 24-year-old farmworker, died of heatstroke while working the field last month when the heat index reached 105 degrees Fahrenheit. Earlier this month, 52-year-old Cruz Urias-Beltran was found dead in a cornfield in Nebraska after temperatures topped 100°F. Postal worker Peggy Frank died in her mail truck near Los Angeles on July 6, when the temperature reached 117°F. She was 63. As the climate changes, heat waves are poised to get longer and more intense. That means more workers will face triple-digit temperatures, often for single-digit wages, threatening lives and livelihoods. While much of the rest of the workforce is in air-conditioned offices and stores, they’re not immune to the economic blows from climate change. By 2028, climate change will cost the US $360 billion per year, about half the expected growth of the economy, according...
California hit with two heat waves in less than a month.

California hit with two heat waves in less than a month.

SOURCE: Mashable DATE: July 24, 2018 SNIP: Historic heat records fell in California earlier this month. Yet, two weeks later, another mass of warm air has returned to the southern part of the state, heating the region for days. The second heat wave of July will last from Monday through Thursday, said the National Weather Service. While this heat won’t be quite as severe as the last, it’ll still bring “record and near-record high temperatures” to different areas of California. As average temperatures around the globe continue their accelerated rise, extreme heat events like these are becoming more and more frequent. “The big picture is clear,” Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at the University of California, Los Angeles, said in an interview. “As our temperatures globally have been increasing, we’ve been seeing a lot more record-breaking heat waves,” said Swain. “With greenhouse-gas induced warming temperatures, heatwaves are expected to become more common,” Robert Weisenmiller, Chair of the California Energy Commission, said via email. “The number and duration of heat waves will also increase and, again, high temperature records will be broken more frequently,” said Weisenmiller. “There are many variables with weather, but scientist around the world agree, in general, extreme weather is becoming more common, along with rising seas, prolonged droughts, and more frequent...
A Global Heat Wave Has Set the Arctic Circle on Fire

A Global Heat Wave Has Set the Arctic Circle on Fire

SOURCE: NY Mag DATE: July 20, 2018 SNIP: From Japan to Sweden, and Oman to Texas, a global heat wave is setting records, igniting wildfires, and killing dozens all across the world this week. The south-central region is home to the highest temperatures in the U.S. this week, with nearly 35 million people living under excessive heat warnings issued by the National Weather Service. Temperatures are expected to be in the triple digits across Texas this weekend, marking the most severe heat wave in the state since 2011. Across the globe in Kyoto, Japan, Thursday marked the seventh straight day of temperatures that exceeded 100 degrees, breaking all known records for the ancient capital city. On Thursday alone ten people died and 2,605 people were sent to hospitals in Tokyo due to heat, the Japan Times reports. The day before, Tokyo rescue workers set a record by responding to more than 3,000 emergency calls. Meanwhile, in Sweden, the Arctic Circle is on fire. High temperatures and a prolonged drought have caused 49 fires to ignite across Sweden, with temperatures reaching 90 degrees as far north as the Arctic Circle this week. According to the Washington Post, temperatures in Scandinavia typically settle in the 60s and 70s this time of year, meaning the current heat wave is making things around 20 degrees hotter than...
Heat waves bother you? Under Trump climate policies, add another 12°F

Heat waves bother you? Under Trump climate policies, add another 12°F

SOURCE: Think Progress DATE: July 9, 2018 SNIP: Extreme heat has smashed temperature records around the country and around the world in the past week alone. But if we fail to significantly curb emissions of carbon pollution — the path set forth by President Trump’s climate policies — then these severe and deadly heatwaves will become the normal summer weather over the next few decades. Typical five-day heat waves in the U.S. will be 12°F warmer by mid-century alone, according to the U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA), which the White House itself reviewed and approved last November. America (and much of the world) will start seeing monster “humid heat waves” — where the heat index hits a fatal 131°F — every other year by century’s end. Heat wave records have been falling at an astonishing rate in recent days around the country and around the globe. The brutal heat has spurred wildfires, water shortages, asthma attacks, power emergencies, and the like. In many cases, the records were not simply beaten, they were obliterated. As NOAA reported in Southern California, where temperature records go back 140 years, records for July 6 were disintegrated by 14°F in downtown Los Angeles and Camarillo, and by 16°F in San Luis Obispo. In Van Nuys, it hit 117°F on Friday, destroying the previous record for the day (99°F) by an astounding 18°F — and that record was just set last year. The congressionally-mandated NCA, the “authoritative assessment of the science of climate change, with a focus on the United States,” projects a stunning 8°F to 10°F average warming over the interior of this country...