Second Biggest Jump in Annual CO2 Levels Reported as Trump Leaves Paris Climate Agreement

Second Biggest Jump in Annual CO2 Levels Reported as Trump Leaves Paris Climate Agreement

SOURCE: Inside Climate News DATE: June 1, 2017 SNIP: As President Donald Trump prepared to pull the United States out of the global Paris climate agreement this week, scientists at NOAA reported that 2016 had recorded the second-biggest jump in atmospheric carbon dioxide on record. Last year’s increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration was nearly double the average pace since detailed measurements started in 1979. Concentrations of other greenhouse gases, including methane and nitrous oxide, also increased last year, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s latest update to its greenhouse gas index. The heating effect of all combined greenhouses gases in the atmosphere increased by 2.5 percent in 2016, according to the...
Atmospheric CO2 levels accelerate upwards, smashing records

Atmospheric CO2 levels accelerate upwards, smashing records

SOURCE: National Observer DATE: April 10, 2017 SNIP: The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere continues to accelerate upwards despite global efforts. The last two years had “unprecedented” increases. Canadian CO2 extraction is playing an oversized role. The primary driver of global warming, disruptive climate changes and ocean acidification is the ever-increasing amount of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. Despite decades of global efforts towards climate policies, clean energy and efficiency, CO2 levels continue to rise and are actually accelerating upwards. For those of us hoping for signs of climate progress, this most critical and basic climate data is bitter news indeed. It shows humanity racing ever more rapidly into a full-blown crisis for both our climate and our oceans. Read the rest of this excellent post...
Carbon Footprint of Canada’s Oil Sands Is Larger Than Thought

Carbon Footprint of Canada’s Oil Sands Is Larger Than Thought

SOURCE: Inside Climate News DATE: April 4, 2017 SNIP: The Donald Trump administration approved the Keystone XL pipeline knowing the tar sands crude oil it would deliver from Canada is even more polluting than the Obama administration thought when it turned the project down in 2015. Recent government studies of a different tar sands pipeline found that the project’s greenhouse gas emissions “may be five to 20 percent higher than previously indicated,” the State Department noted on March 23 in its decision approving the Keystone XL...
Forest fragmentation may be releasing much more carbon than we think

Forest fragmentation may be releasing much more carbon than we think

SOURCE: Mongabay DATE: March 31, 2017 SNIP: The earth’s forests have been broken into around 50 million fragments, the edges of which add up to a length that would make it a third of the way to the sun and which increase annual tropical deforestation carbon emissions by 31 percent. This, according to a new study published recently in Nature Communications that reveals forest fragmentation may be much more destructive than previously thought. … Current estimates peg the volume of carbon emissions from the clearing of tropical forests at around 1,100 million metric tons annually. Using field data and computer modeling, the team calculated 340 million more metric tons of carbon may be released globally due to forest edge effects. In other words, the study finds forest fragmentation may be contributing 31 percent more carbon to the atmosphere than previous estimates are accounting...
Carbon dioxide levels rose at record pace for 2nd straight year

Carbon dioxide levels rose at record pace for 2nd straight year

SOURCE: NOAA and The Washington Post. DATE: March 10, 2017 SNIP: Carbon dioxide levels measured at NOAA’s Mauna Loa Baseline Atmospheric Observatory rose by 3 parts per million to 405.1 parts per million (ppm) in 2016, an increase that matched the record jump observed in 2015. The two-year, 6-ppm surge in the greenhouse gas between 2015 and 2017 is unprecedented in the observatory’s 59-year record. And, it was a record fifth consecutive year that carbon dioxide (CO2) rose by 2 ppm or greater, said Pieter Tans, lead scientist of NOAA’s Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network. “The rate of CO2 growth over the last decade is 100 to 200 times faster than what the Earth experienced during the transition from the last Ice Age,” Tans said. “This is a real shock to the...