Arctic is warmest it’s been in 10,000 years, study suggests

Arctic is warmest it’s been in 10,000 years, study suggests

SOURCE: CBC News DATE: April 12, 2019 SNIP: New research suggests Canada’s Arctic is the warmest it has been in 10,000 years — and the temperatures are still climbing. The study was recently published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. Researchers studied permafrost samples in the Yukon near the Dempster Highway and determined that temperatures in the Arctic today are almost 2 C warmer than at any time in the past 10,000 years. The temperatures recorded today are even higher than the previous highs believed to have occurred during the early Holocene period, about 9,900 and 6,400 years ago, when Earth’s axis was tilted more strongly toward the sun, the report states. Duane Froese, a professor at the University of Alberta and a co-author of the study, suggests that time period may actually be much longer. “I would guess we’re getting back over 100,000 years since we’ve seen temperatures at least this warm,” he said. Last month, the UN released its environment report on the Arctic, which describes scenarios where Arctic winter temperatures increase by three to five degrees by 2050 compared to...
Climate Change May Cause 26,000 More U.S. Suicides by 2050

Climate Change May Cause 26,000 More U.S. Suicides by 2050

SOURCE: The Atlantic and Nature Climate Change DATE: July 23, 2018 SNIP: Unusually hot days cause the suicide rate to rise, according to a study published Monday in Nature Climate Change. If a month is 1 degree Celsius warmer than normal, then its suicide rate will increase by 0.7 percent in the United States and 2.1 percent in Mexico. “It’s sort of a brutal finding,” says Marshall Burke, a professor of earth science at Stanford University and one of the authors of the paper. The finding has anxious implications for a world whose climate is rapidly changing. The authors project that roughly 14,000 people—and as many as 26,000—could die by suicide in the United States by 2050 if humanity does not reduce its emissions of greenhouse-gas pollution. “‘Climate change is going to generate winners and losers’—this is a phrase you hear all the time,” Burke said. “But for this outcome, it’s all losers. There are no winners. We find these strong linear relationships everywhere when you crank up the temperature.” “We don’t see a mitigating effect of air-conditioner adoption on any of these effects,” Burke said. “Even once you control for income, you still don’t see air-conditioner use come through as a factor. Suicide is a fundamentally different animal than these other types of mortality, like cardiac mortality, that you see in the...
Phoenix’s notoriously unrelenting heat will soon get even worse.

Phoenix’s notoriously unrelenting heat will soon get even worse.

SOURCE: Vice DATE: September 18, 2017 SNIP: The historical average number of days per year in Phoenix that hit 100 degrees is a mind-bending 92. But that number is rapidly rising as climate change bears down on America’s fifth-largest city. “It’s currently the fastest warming big city in the US,” meteorologist and former Arizonan Eric Holthaus told me in an email. A study from Climate Central last year projects that Phoenix’s summer weather will be on average three to five degrees hotter by 2050. Meanwhile, that average number of 100-degree days will have skyrocketed by almost 40, to 132, according to another 2016 Climate Central study. (For reference, over a comparable period, New York City is expected to go from two to 15 100-degree days.) As bad as the deadly heat is getting, there’s another potential horror coming: drought. “As much as 20 percent of the [Colorado] River could dry up by 2050,” Holthaus told...