Why is the world’s population growing faster than expected?

Why is the world’s population growing faster than expected?

SOURCE: Tree Hugger DATE: July 10, 2018 SNIP: Every two or three years, in a series of publications entitled World Population Prospects, the United Nations issues a forecast for the future growth of the world population. In the course of the 15 years of the examined prospects—from 2002 to 2017—the forecast world population for 2050 increased by about 10%, or a staggering 0.9 billion. From the report: “The current world population of 7.6 billion is expected to reach 8.6 billion in 2030, 9.8 billion in 2050 and 11.2 billion in 2100, according to a new United Nations report being launched today. With roughly 83 million people being added to the world’s population every year, the upward trend in population size is expected to continue, even assuming that fertility levels will continue to decline.” [T]here are two key reasons for the large increases in the forecast world population: general increases in both the assumed fertility rates and the assumed life expectancies—both being critical factors in the forecasting process. If the latest projections prove to be accurate, we need to plan for about a 10% increase in the needed supply of food, drinking water, and energy, and in carbon dioxide emissions by 2050, compared to a projection from just 15 years earlier. Furthermore, given the continuously increasing projections for 2050, we also need to be prepared for the possibility that the actual future fertility rates and life expectancies would be even higher than those assumed in the latest projections. That would result in even larger future world population than in the latest United Nations projections, with the consequent additional strain on...
News Flash: You Need to Care About Human Population Growth Now

News Flash: You Need to Care About Human Population Growth Now

SOURCE: Medium DATE: July 7, 2017 SNIP: Last month the UN finalized the 2017 revision of the World Population Prospects report. Among other things, the report predicts human population growth trends — including where population will be centered and how many people will be added to the planet in the future. And once again, the UN has had to revise those predictions. Human population is growing even faster than we thought it would be just two years ago. According to the most recent revision, there will be an estimated 9.8 billion people on the planet by 2050. That’s up from 9.7 billion from the revision two years ago. And in the 2013 revision to the report? The prediction was 9.6 billion. Noticing a pattern? It isn’t that the UN is bad at math; human population is growing, and instead of tapering off or even trending down, it’s skyrocketing. And for wildlife and the environment pushed to extinction and demolished to make way for humans, this trend is bad news. And while .1 billion might not seem like a scary figure, we should put that into perspective. That’s 100 million more people than we previously expected. That’s like adding another Beijing, Paris, London, New York, Tokyo, Moscow, Jakarta and Delhi to the world. So we’re either talking about the impact of another 8 to 10 megacities, or we’re talking about 100 million more people living in abject poverty, or we’re talking about an astonishing amount of sprawl taking over our remaining wild places. Or all of the above. And that’s on top of the previously projected growth of more than 2 billion...
The world’s population is growing faster than we thought

The world’s population is growing faster than we thought

SOURCE: Science Alert DATE: September 1, 2016 SNIP: For years, experts have suggested that the human population is growing at a startling rate. But it might be accelerating at an even greater rate than previous predictions. According to a new report by the Population Reference Bureau (PRB), the world’s population could swell to 9.9 billion by 2050. There are an estimated 7.6 billion people on the planet today, so when you do the math, the global population could be 33 percent larger in 35 years than it is today. That prediction is bigger than the most recent estimates in the United Nations report, which suggested the world’s population would reach 9.6 billion by...