Anger as US parks service announces largest mobile phone coverage expansion in history

Anger as US parks service announces largest mobile phone coverage expansion in history

SOURCE: The Telegraph DATE: August 31, 2019 SNIP: The hills of one of America’s most spectacular national parks will soon be alive with the sound of mobile phone ring tones, after Grand Teton approved controversial plans for phone coverage inside one of the country’s most treasured national parks. The biggest expansion of telecoms coverage in the history of the national parks service comes as campaigners battle to maintain peace and serenity in the wilderness across the US. “It’s a harbinger of what’s to come,” warned Jeff Ruch, Pacific Director for Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER), which has campaigned against the expansion. He told The Sunday Telegraph that the Grand Canyon is next, with five mobile phone towers scheduled for approval. Plans are also in the works for Olympic national park in Washington state; Crater Lake in Oregon; Lake Mead in Nevada and Arizona, and southern Utah’s Bryce Canyon, he said. Nine mobile phone towers are to be installed across the 310,000-acre Grand Teton park in Wyoming, where America’s most celebrated landscape photographer Ansel Adams captured stunning images in the 1940s. At the same time, 63 miles of fibre optic cables will be installed in the park, visited by over three million people a year. Mr Ruch said: “Even if you don’t have your phone on you, it now means that the person next to you can be streaming music, downloading a movie, or hunting Pokemon. You’re depriving people of the ability to...
‘Tsunami of data’ could consume one fifth of global electricity by 2025

‘Tsunami of data’ could consume one fifth of global electricity by 2025

SOURCE: Climate Change News DATE: December 11, 2017 SNIP: The communications industry could use 20% of all the world’s electricity by 2025, hampering global attempts to meet climate change targets and straining grids as demand by power-hungry server farms storing digital data from billions of smartphones, tablets and internet-connected devices grows exponentially. The industry has long argued that it can considerably reduce carbon emissions by increasing efficiency and reducing waste, but academics are challenging industry assumptions. A new paper, due to be published by US researchers later this month, will forecast that information and communications technology, or ICT, could create up to 3.5% of global emissions by 2020 – surpassing aviation and shipping – and up to 14% 2040 – around the same proportion as the US today. In an update to a 2016 peer-reviewed study, Andrae found that without dramatic increases in efficiency, the ICT industry could use 20% of all electricity and emit up to 5.5% of the world’s carbon emissions by 2025. This would be more than any country except the US, China and India. He expects industry power demand to increase from 2-300Twh of electricity a year now, to 1,200 or even 3,000Twh by 2025. Data centres on their own could produce 1.9Gt (or 3.2% of the global total) carbon emissions, he says. “The situation is alarming,” said Andrae, who works for Chinese communications technology firm Huawei. Greenpeace IT analyst Gary Cook says only about 20% of the electricity used in the world’s data centres is so far...