Taking the Long View: The ‘Forever Legacy’ of Climate Change

Taking the Long View: The ‘Forever Legacy’ of Climate Change

SOURCE: Yale Environment 360 DATE: September 12, 2017 SNIP: Although we will unquestionably have a less hospitable climate in 2100 than today, that will be nothing compared to what might lie in store in 2200 and beyond. Yes, in 2100, sea levels might be three or more feet higher than today, which will be bad for low-lying nations like Bangladesh and U.S. states like Florida. But if greenhouse gas emissions continue at roughly today’s levels for another century, that may mean that sea levels 500 years from now would be nearly 50 feet higher as the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets melt. That would mean losing large swaths of coastal areas worldwide. This is not alarmism; this is where the science takes...
Sea Levels Will Rise Faster Than Ever

Sea Levels Will Rise Faster Than Ever

SOURCE: Scientific American DATE: November 8, 2016 AUTHOR: Scott Waldman SNIP: Sea levels across the globe will rise faster than at any time throughout human history if the Earth’s warming continues beyond 2 degrees Celsius. … If the rate of carbon emissions continues unabated, the authors said, the globe would warm by 2 degrees and cause significant sea-level rise by 2040. It would be worse along the East Coast of North America and Norway, which are expected to experience a sea-level rise of about a foot. The relative speed of the sea’s rise means many areas won’t have time to adapt, researchers found. And from there, warming would accelerate even...
Sea levels could be rising faster than we think

Sea levels could be rising faster than we think

SOURCE: ScienceNordic DATE: January 18, 2016 AUTHOR: Kristian Sjøgren SNIP: The Greenland ice sheet might not be retaining as much water as scientists previously thought. This means more melt water flows into the ocean, where it contributes to global sea level rise. New research from the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) shows that global warming has created layers of ice within the ice sheet, which act as a barrier to prevent snowmelt from penetrating deeper into the ice sheet. “After very hot periods, like the ones we had in 2009 and 2010, layers of ice are created within the ice cap. These layers [prevent] the lower part of the ice sheet from absorbing melting water,” says co-author Professor Jason Box from the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS). “In the area that we studied, we have only three metres of snow to collect melt water instead of 40 metres. This means that more melt water ends up in the sea, which is an unpleasant surprise, and will probably mean that estimates of future sea level should be adjusted upwards,” he...