Heat waves bother you? Under Trump climate policies, add another 12°F

Heat waves bother you? Under Trump climate policies, add another 12°F

SOURCE: Think Progress DATE: July 9, 2018 SNIP: Extreme heat has smashed temperature records around the country and around the world in the past week alone. But if we fail to significantly curb emissions of carbon pollution — the path set forth by President Trump’s climate policies — then these severe and deadly heatwaves will become the normal summer weather over the next few decades. Typical five-day heat waves in the U.S. will be 12°F warmer by mid-century alone, according to the U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA), which the White House itself reviewed and approved last November. America (and much of the world) will start seeing monster “humid heat waves” — where the heat index hits a fatal 131°F — every other year by century’s end. Heat wave records have been falling at an astonishing rate in recent days around the country and around the globe. The brutal heat has spurred wildfires, water shortages, asthma attacks, power emergencies, and the like. In many cases, the records were not simply beaten, they were obliterated. As NOAA reported in Southern California, where temperature records go back 140 years, records for July 6 were disintegrated by 14°F in downtown Los Angeles and Camarillo, and by 16°F in San Luis Obispo. In Van Nuys, it hit 117°F on Friday, destroying the previous record for the day (99°F) by an astounding 18°F — and that record was just set last year. The congressionally-mandated NCA, the “authoritative assessment of the science of climate change, with a focus on the United States,” projects a stunning 8°F to 10°F average warming over the interior of this country...
Africa may have witnessed its all-time hottest temperature Thursday: 124 degrees in Algeria

Africa may have witnessed its all-time hottest temperature Thursday: 124 degrees in Algeria

SOURCE: Washington Post DATE: July 6, 2018 SNIP: The planet’s hottest continent probably just endured its hottest weather ever reliably measured. An Algerian city soared to 124.3 degrees (51.3 Celsius) Thursday, adding to the onslaught of records for extreme heat set around the planet during the past 10 days. The blistering-hot temperature reading, observed in Ouargla, is probably the highest temperature ever reliably measured both in Algeria and in all of Africa. Ouargla, with a population of nearly half a million, is located in north central Algeria, roughly midway between Morocco and Tunisia. This probable all-time heat record is one of many set over the past 10 days because of numerous intense heat domes scattered around the Northern Hemisphere. Locations where heat records have been set include: In North America: Denver; Montreal; Mount Washington, N.H., and Burlington, Vt. In Europe: Glasgow, Scotland, Shannon, Ireland, Belfast, and Castlederg, Northern Island In Eurasia: Tbilisi, Georgia and Yerevan, Armenia In the Middle East: Quriyat, Oman, which posted the world’s hottest low temperature ever recorded on June 28: 109 degrees (42.6 Celsius). While no single heat record, in isolation, can be attributed to global warming, collectively, this large group is consistent with the kind of extreme heat we expect to see increase in a warming...
The U.S. just had its warmest May in history, blowing past 1934 Dust Bowl record

The U.S. just had its warmest May in history, blowing past 1934 Dust Bowl record

SOURCE: Washington Post DATE: June 8, 2018 SNIP: Almost every tract of land in the contiguous United States was warmer than normal in May, helping to break a Dust Bowl-era record. The month’s average temperature 0f 65.4 degrees swept by the previous high mark of 64.7 degrees set in 1934. Temperatures were more than 5 degrees above normal, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which published a May U.S. climate assessment Wednesday. The 1934 record was impressive, enduring for decades even as the climate has warmed because of increasing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. One of the main reasons May 1934 was so hot was because it was so dry, posting the least precipitation for the month on record. When the land surface is dry, it heats up faster. In May 2018, temperatures soared to record levels even without as much help from dry soils. Precipitation was a hair above normal averaged over the nation. Maryland, hit by major floods in Frederick and Ellicott City, had its wettest May on record. So did Florida. Asheville, N.C., posted 14.68 inches of rain, its wettest month in history. Rather than dry soil, the record warmth this past May can be traced to the jet stream, the high-altitude current that separates cold air from warm air. It lifted north of the U.S.-Canadian border for much of the month, allowing widespread abnormally warm air to flood northward. It’s also fair to say that rising greenhouse gas concentrations, which have pushed May temperatures higher over time and now even above those torrid Dust Bowl years, contributed to the record temperatures. Across the...
Dallas had never hit 90 degrees in November. It just did so three of the past four days.

Dallas had never hit 90 degrees in November. It just did so three of the past four days.

SOURCE: Washington Post DATE: November 6, 2017 SNIP: Up until this year, in 118 years of weather records, Dallas had never hit 90 degrees during November. It just did so three times in the past four days. The heat that scorched Dallas is part of record-setting heat wave that has consumed most of the Lonestar State to start November. In Austin, Houston and San Antonio as well, temperatures soared some 10 to 20 degrees above normal, levels more typical of September. Dallas hit 94 on both Thursday and Sunday, shattering the previous daily records of 87 (set in 2012) and 89 (from 2005). The 94-degree temperature became the highest ever recorded in November by five degrees and the hottest so late in the season. Dallas also set a record high of 90 Saturday, breaking the record of 88 from...
Warm winters, scorching summers: New maps project impact of climate change

Warm winters, scorching summers: New maps project impact of climate change

SOURCE: National Post DATE: October 26, 2017 SNIP: Is this the end of the Great Canadian winter? A new report says that even if greenhouse gas emissions are reduced, all of Canada is projected to get warmer by the end of the century, while the number of 30 C plus days per year are predicted to “explode” under the current global warming trajectory. Overall, the globe is projected to warm by two to three degrees Celsius by 2051 to 2080, compared to 12 degrees or more for some places in the Canadian High Arctic, assuming the high-carbon future we’re trending towards, Smith said in an email. Toronto’s summers are projected to warm by four degrees Celsius by 2051 to 2080 in a high-carbon scenario; in comparison, its winters are projected to warm five degrees Celsius. Churchill summers will warm by 3.5 degrees Celsius; its winters by nine...