Dallas had never hit 90 degrees in November. It just did so three of the past four days.

Dallas had never hit 90 degrees in November. It just did so three of the past four days.

SOURCE: Washington Post DATE: November 6, 2017 SNIP: Up until this year, in 118 years of weather records, Dallas had never hit 90 degrees during November. It just did so three times in the past four days. The heat that scorched Dallas is part of record-setting heat wave that has consumed most of the Lonestar State to start November. In Austin, Houston and San Antonio as well, temperatures soared some 10 to 20 degrees above normal, levels more typical of September. Dallas hit 94 on both Thursday and Sunday, shattering the previous daily records of 87 (set in 2012) and 89 (from 2005). The 94-degree temperature became the highest ever recorded in November by five degrees and the hottest so late in the season. Dallas also set a record high of 90 Saturday, breaking the record of 88 from...
Warm winters, scorching summers: New maps project impact of climate change

Warm winters, scorching summers: New maps project impact of climate change

SOURCE: National Post DATE: October 26, 2017 SNIP: Is this the end of the Great Canadian winter? A new report says that even if greenhouse gas emissions are reduced, all of Canada is projected to get warmer by the end of the century, while the number of 30 C plus days per year are predicted to “explode” under the current global warming trajectory. Overall, the globe is projected to warm by two to three degrees Celsius by 2051 to 2080, compared to 12 degrees or more for some places in the Canadian High Arctic, assuming the high-carbon future we’re trending towards, Smith said in an email. Toronto’s summers are projected to warm by four degrees Celsius by 2051 to 2080 in a high-carbon scenario; in comparison, its winters are projected to warm five degrees Celsius. Churchill summers will warm by 3.5 degrees Celsius; its winters by nine...
Australia’s record-breaking winter warmth linked to climate change

Australia’s record-breaking winter warmth linked to climate change

SOURCE: The Conversation DATE: September 1, 2017 SNIP: On the first day of spring [in Australia], it’s time to take stock of the winter that was. It may have felt cold, but Australia’s winter had the highest average daytime temperatures on record. It was also the driest in 15 years. The record winter warmth is part of a long-term upward trend in Australian winter temperatures. This prompts the question: how much has human-caused climate change altered the likelihood of extremely warm winters in Australia? I used a standard event attribution methodology to estimate the role of climate change in this event. By my calculations there has been at least a 60-fold increase in the likelihood of a record warm winter that can be attributed to human-caused climate change. The human influence on the climate has increased Australia’s temperatures during the warmest winters by close to...
No El Nino? No problem. Earth sizzles to near record heat

No El Nino? No problem. Earth sizzles to near record heat

SOURCE: Phys.org DATE: March 17, 2017 SNIP: Even without an El Nino warming the world’s waters, Earth in February sizzled to its second hottest temperature on record, behind only last year. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration calculated that February 2017 averaged 55.66 degrees (13.08 degrees Celsius). That’s 1.76 degrees (.98 degrees Celsius) warmer than the 20th century average. It was also the second hottest winter in the northern hemisphere on record. Records go back to 1880. In the past, Earth doesn’t come near record heat if there’s no El Nino. This year it did—on every...