Chinese demand leads to huge jump in crude oil exports from B.C.

Chinese demand leads to huge jump in crude oil exports from B.C.

SOURCE: Vancouver Sun DATE: March 24, 2019 SNIP: A combination of Chinese demand and increased pipeline space led to a massive increase in the export of crude oil out of the Port of Vancouver last year. Figures provided by the port showed there were 22 million barrels of crude exported from B.C. in 2018, compared to 13 million barrels in 2017 and 8.7 million barrels in 2016. Kevin Birn, vice-president of IHS Markit in Calgary, said that almost all crude oil exported from the province comes via the Canadian-government owned Trans Mountain pipeline from Edmonton. The Trans Mountain pipeline allows for a variety of petroleum types and products to be shipped, ranging from jet fuel and kerosene to heavy crude oil and oilsands. “The world is hunting for heavy barrels and Canada has them. It’s just about being able to access it. If they can get it to the Westridge terminal it will go. That’s why they want to twin [the Trans Mountain pipeline],” Birn said. Plans to twin the pipeline stalled last year when then pipeline owner Kinder Morgan said it would not go ahead with plans due to a Federal Court ruling that stalled the project, plus resistance from the B.C. government, climate change protesters and some First Nations groups. The Canadian-government stepped in and bought the asset for $4.4 billion and has promised the expanded pipeline will be...
‘This is a really big deal’: Canada natural gas emissions far worse than feared

‘This is a really big deal’: Canada natural gas emissions far worse than feared

SOURCE: The Guardian DATE: October 18, 2017 SNIP: Alberta’s oil and gas industry – Canada’s largest producer of fossil fuel resources – could be emitting 25 to 50% more methane than previously believed, new research has suggested. The pioneering peer reviewed study, published in Environmental Science & Technology on Tuesday, used airplane surveys to measure methane emissions from oil and gas infrastructure in two regions in Alberta. The results were then compared with industry-reported emissions and estimates of unreported sources of the powerful greenhouse gas, which warm the planet more than 20 times as much as similar volumes of carbon dioxide. “Our first reaction was ‘Oh my goodness, this is a really big deal,” said Matthew Johnson, a professor at Carleton University in Ottawa and one of the study’s authors. “If we thought it was bad, it’s worse.” The study then sought to conservatively extrapolate the findings, correcting only for sites that are home to heavy oil. What they found was in Alberta – home to 68% of Canada’s natural gas production, 47% of its light crude oil production as well as 80% of all crude oil and equivalents – total emissions were likely 25 to 50% higher than previous government estimates. The findings excluded mined oil sands, which are believed to be responsible for about 11% of methane...