A building El Niño in 2018 signals more extreme weather for 2019

A building El Niño in 2018 signals more extreme weather for 2019

SOURCE: Grist DATE: May 22, 2018 SNIP: In case you couldn’t get enough extreme weather, the next 12 months or so could bring even more scorching temps, punishing droughts, and unstoppable wildfires. It’s still early, but odds are quickly rising that another El Niño — the periodic warming of the tropical Pacific Ocean — could be forming. The latest official outlook from NOAA and Columbia University gives better-than-even odds of El Niño materializing by the end of this year, which could lead to a cascade of dangerous weather around the globe in 2019. That’s a troubling development, especially when people worldwide are still suffering from the last El Niño, which ended two years ago. El Niño has amazingly far-reaching effects, spurring droughts in Africa and typhoons swirling toward China and Japan. It’s a normal, natural ocean phenomenon, but there’s emerging evidence that climate change is spurring more extreme El Niño-related events. On average though, El Niño boosts global temperatures and redistributes weather patterns worldwide in a pretty predictable way. Initial estimates show that, if the building El Niño actually arrives, 2019 would stand a good chance at knocking off 2016 as the warmest year on record. Images by Patrick Brown and NOAA’s National Weather...
Another El Nino problem: More carbon dioxide in air

Another El Nino problem: More carbon dioxide in air

SOURCE: AP News DATE: October 13, 2017 SNIP: A new NASA satellite has found another thing to blame on El Nino: A recent record high increase of carbon dioxide in the air. The super-sized El Nino a couple of years ago led to an increase of 3 billion tons of carbon in the air, most from tropical land areas. The El Nino made it more difficult for plants to suck up man-made carbon emissions and sparked fires that released more carbon into the atmosphere. The effect was so large that it was the main factor in the biggest one-year jump in heat-trapping gas levels in modern record, NASA scientists...
The oceans are becoming too hot for coral, and sooner than we expected

The oceans are becoming too hot for coral, and sooner than we expected

SOURCE: The Conversation DATE: October 9, 2015 SNIP: This week, scientists registered their concern that super-warm conditions are building to a point where corals are severely threatened across the tropical Indian, Pacific and Atlantic oceans. They did so after seeing corals lose colour across the three major ocean basins – a sign of a truly momentous global change. This is only the third global bleaching event in recorded...